Thin Places | Children’s Poetry

32608482Thin Places is a poetry book written by Lesley Choyce—it has one single narrative running through in free verse. The story follows Declan Lynch who is young, lives in North America, and is a little unusual. He is not popular at school nor very well liked. He feels out of place even in his own family, out of place, out of time. He narrates:

I want to live in my own kingdom

An island filled with amazing beings

Only I can imagine

Things get stranger when he begins to hear voices from what his parents call his ‘imaginary friends’ but he himself feels their presence to be much more significant. Over time, he can’t tell if the voices he hears are real or made up. The most significant voice in his head is that of a young maiden named Rebecca who guides him to travel to his ancestral home (Ireland) and explore its thin places. She tells him that thin places are:

These are places where they say

The spirit world and the physical world

Are close together.

Sacred places

Ancient burial sites.

This work as a story contains many elements from Celtic Mythology, Irish landscape, and childhood imagination. In its format however, the book is written in non-rhyming verse for children. I would probably recommend this to children around the age of 6-8. The main complaint I’ve read so far from its early reviews is that the poetry is not in any way challenging. There’s nothing to read further into, rather, it is a short story with its sentences divided to look like poetry. While I agree it may be that way for adults, I think it may be different for the age group targeted. I am by no means suggesting that children can’t handle advanced verse, but I remember from my personal experience a time when poems were presented to me as obstacles and challenges. Poems were never something to enjoy but something to dissect and discuss with a lot of pressure attached. I thought that they were all written by people like Shakespeare and that it would automatically be hard to understand. It wasn’t until later years in high school when I began to appreciate poetry. Since free verse has taken over, I think it’s time to start introducing children to non-rhyming poetry as well. I haven’t encountered much free verse for children and I’m glad that books like these exist. Choyce makes poetry accessible to children with this collection. The narrative captured in Thin Places is as lovely in content as any Dr. Seuss poem or Shel Silverstein only without the rhyming.

I would recommend this for parents with young children who want to introduce poetry to their young ones. This is a book to read in one sitting and children’s libraries as well as elementary school libraries should have this in their collection.

This book will be published by Dundurn.

One comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s