Author: Andreea

Pillow Thoughts & The Road Between | Courtney Peppernell | Poetry Review

I was recently introduced to Courtney Pepernell’s works through Instagram and I requested her two poetry books that will be released later this year from Andrew McMeel Publishing: Pillow Thoughts and The Road Between—both collections will be released on August 29. Courtney Peppernell is an LGBTQ author from Sydney, Australia focusing on Young Adult novels and Poetry Collections. Keeping Long Island is her third title release, and the first under her new book brand, Pepper Books. Pepper Books is a publishing house that has just been started this year and will focus on Poetry and LGBT communities.

Pillow Thoughts

35489042This collection was first self-published on October 4th, 2016 and has recently been picked up by Andrew McMeel. Pillow Thoughts is about love. It sort of took me by surprise when I noticed that it rhymes in a ‘fun Dr. Seuss’ kind of way but the subject matter itself is deep and honest. If I had to compare I would say it’s a combination of John Keats and Dr. Seuss. It sets up this sort of innocent, whimsical-humour-seriousness from the beginning with this poem:

Before we begin, I’d like to share a story.

Once upon a time there was a jellyfish. We’ll call it

You.

You became lost sometimes

You could be a little unsure

You tried very hard.

But sometimes it didn’t feel like enough.

I hate to spoil the ending

But you is fine

You is still here.

You is going to make it.

The references to “you is” as a trending internet meme-culture joke is preceeded by a quotation from the Chainsmokers. This lightness of “the here and now” touched with recognizable references makes Peppernell very relatable and accessible as a young emerging poet.

Throughout her collection these references occur. Peppernell places before us lines and images we’ve seen repeatedly on online forums. For instance, she alludes to the famously known Albert Camus quotation changing it slightly:

“you promised you’d never take a road that I could not follow”

The poems in this collection go through love, heartbreak, and the various kinds of dynamics that exist in a relationship between young people. Based on the language used and the style of choice I think this book is ideal for preteens and teenagers. At its core this collection has a message which to me is: you will experience all this and you will hit some serious downfalls, however you will be okay. Everything will be okay in the end.

The Road Between

35489039This collection is exploring growth, mapping the metaphorical geographical spaces in one’s life. I.e. the caves you hide in when you are afraid.

I enjoyed this collection more than the one mentioned above because it deals with various aspects of one’s life where love is a part of it rather than its center.

This collection is also filled with proverb-like sentences like:

“you are not defined by the stage you are at in life. Just because you are unsure of where you are heading doesn’t mean you don’t know who you are inside.”

Untitled

The Cave

I read some reviews of Pillow Talk shaming Peppernell’s use of language and simplicity. I think we need to look at poems like Peppernell’s as: us the readers getting a glimpse into an individual’s growth and healing journey. Peppernell uses poetry as a way to understand herself growing up different. There are many “in the closet” references throughout her poetry, or hiding in a cave for comfort. I think it was more important for Peppernell to write this collection than it is for us to read it and/or judge it. As a reader and poetry lover I find it difficult to review things that are so personal. I wish Peppenell did more with the language, and played around with the structure. I also think some poems shouldn’t have been incorporated in the collection as they distract from the whole. However, I am happy these collections exist and I’m very excited to see what Peppernell will release in her newly created LGBT-focused poetry publishing house. Overall I enjoyed The Road Between more than Pillow Thoughts and both strongly reminded me of Rupi Kaur’s Milk and Honey, so if you enjoyed that collection perhaps give Peppernell a try.

Again if I were to recommend this to readers I would direct this to a younger audience perhaps ages 12-16.

Wanderlust Reading List

Wonderlust

Summer is here! Not only is the weather just right for traveling and having adventures of your own, but it’s also a great time to read books that inspire wanderlust. The list contains several books I read and thoroughly enjoyed along with some that fellow librarians, family, and friends have recommended. Hopefully there will be at least one title in the list that is right for you.

For full list downloadable and printable PDF click HERE <–

For other recommendations based on reader preferences check out this Goodreads LIST

I also highly recommend Tristan Gooley’s books The Lost Art of Reading Nature’s Signs, and How to Read Nature as a tool when taking nature walks or longer nature trips. His works are very helpful.

The titles below are clickable and it will link you to Amazon if you would like to purchase a copy. The public library should also have at least one copy of each one of these books.  You can also access the Online eBook for free using your library card using OverDrive.

2No Baggage by Clara Bensen  1

A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson

In a Sunburn Country by Bill Bryson

The Good Girl’s Guide to Getting Lost by Rachel Friedman

A Walk Across America by Peter Jenkins

On the Road by Jack Kerouac

The Dharma Bums by Jack Kerouac

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer

Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer

The Longest Way Home by Andrew McCarthy

Vagabonding by Rolf Potts

Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston

Walking the Amazon by Ed Stafford

Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck

Wild by Cheryl Strayed

Honeymoon with My Brother by Franz Wisner

 

 

 

I would also like to share with you another great resource if you like adventure and that is “World Travelers United” blog. You can also find them on Facebook and Instagram. Just looking at the photos inspires wanderlust! Hope you enjoy the reading list and if you would like to recommend others please comment below!

Plank’s Law | Book Review

imagesLast month I reviewed a poetry collection Thin Places by Leslie Choyce which will be released July 29. I received Plank’s Law from LibraryThing Early Reviewers and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

This story follows a teenage boy named Trevor who has lived a sheltered life and now has only one year left to live. He has been diagnosed with Huntington’s disease when he was 10 years old and it has recently aggravated. In a moment of reflection he finds himself on the side of a cliff imagining that he would just jump when an elderly man named ‘Plank’ stops him and starts talking to him. Trevor is having a Hamletesque experience, he says:

 “I think about doing things, but that’s about it.”

Plank tells Trevor that there are two parts to ‘Plank’s Law’ or his own way of living. The first is: “just live” and the second: “Brains don’t count. Imagination is what counts.” Trevor thinks about what Plank has said, and creates a list of all the things he wants to do. As an adult I had to take a step back and understand his choices as a young teenage boy because I don’t think “to drive a Lamborghini” and “get arrested” would be on my bucket list.

Trevor has many moments of reflection where he narrates about his family, and makes various lists like: the primary bucket list, secondary smaller goals, the many factors that shaped his life, and lists about people he meets. As a character his is a little different. He broods a bit more than he does activity, refuses to take too many chances, is intrigued by religion and thinks of himself as a Buddhist and Christian, and loves to watch Sci-Fi films. Trevor’s life changes even more-so when he meets a girl named Sara. Every time he feels lost he revisits the elderly man Plank and is set straight by Plank’s matter-of-fact attitude about life.

The book has a good message and a good premise but I found the vocabulary to be a bit simplistic, especially for its intended audience. There’s also a lot of telling and not enough showing. The first 50 pages are filled with “but before I move on let me tell you about my mom…my dad…my grandpop.” This is a bit too much because no one does this even in real life, you find things out as you go along. This book also contains a lot of profane language especially when Plank needs to come across as a ‘cranky old man’: a lot of “bullshit” and “fuck offs.” Those components irked me a little as a reader.

What I did enjoy was the premise. It’s a good message to stop overthinking, to prioritize imagination, to just live, and take each moment in your stride. There are some great lines scattered through the book from time to time like: “the best parts of your life are the ones you share with someone else.” I also enjoyed the ending in that it wasn’t a cartoon ending, nor was it world-shattering. It was just right and realistic. I prefer realistic endings so hats off in that respect. I also appreciated that Choyce decided to shed some light on Huntington’s disease because I’ve rarely encountered it in young adult fiction. If I were to recommend this book, I would hand it to people who are having a bit of a crisis and need some perspective (teens and adults alike).

The book will be published in September by Orca Book publishers.

Feeling Overwhelmed | New Reading Plan

Keep_Calm_smallOne of the most stressful parts of being a reader and librarian is that I want to feel “on top of everything” when it comes to literature. I want to know what’s coming out, have a good understanding of which books did well in the last few years, and have a full grasp of the classics for my personal growth as a reader. This feels close to impossible lately. I had lists of “must read” classics and then I find that every one of those authors has a back list longer than I imagined. For instance, I was told to read Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier, and suddenly I find myself deep in Jamaica Inn, The Frenchman’s Creek, My Cousin Rachel, and The House on the Strand….and wait…there’s more. That’s just one example of a “modern classic.” But every year there are new books that people are consuming, recommending, and loving. I am thrilled to have so many choices, but also extremely overwhelmed.

I decided to make a sort of selection based on yearly awards for a while. I read Nobel Prize winners, and their back-list (which kept growing), CBC Canada Reads, and the Pulitzer Prize. But then…there’s the British Book Awards, the Women’s Bailey’s Prize, PEN prize, the Irish Book Awards, The Hugo, The Nebula, The Arthur C. Clarke. The next question was, should I just read the winner or the shortlist? For instance, last year in the Women’s Bailey’s Prize Our Glorious Heresies won, but the synopsis that got my attention most was another title from the shortlist: The Portable Veblen. I get extremely overwhelmed and have a fear of missing out. Simultaneously I don’t want to miss out on the core staples of literature when it comes to classics, and modern classics. I feel like I’m sprinting through and reading fast, and then I get ARCs for early review, which leaves me hardly any down time for reflecting on poetry. Last month I received and read more ARCs than I expected and while I did enjoy writing reviews and reading things pre-publication, I didn’t feel like all of them were what I would call substantial. There is also a lot of pressure because I need to be able to articulate a proper review and even if I don’t like it, I owe an explanation as to why not. It may feel presumptuous that I “must” read ARCs but I want to know what to invest in for collection development.

I don’t want to create a TBR list each month because I want there to be room for surprises.

Long story short: I had to set up some rules…or guideline…that can make me feel like I’m on the right path without freaking out.

So here are my monthly reading goals as of now:

Every month I will read:

  • One Classic (Western Canon, Russian Lit, and other Global Classics)
  • One Modern Classic (post 1950): currently reading The Marriage Plot by Eugenides
  • Three to Five ARC Fiction Novels and/or nonfiction for Early Review however they wi
  • Two in the Sci-fi and Fantasy category (can include ARCs but preferably printed)
  • One-Two books that have come out in the last two years and won or was nominated/shortlisted for a significant award. Currently on my radar and list: My Name is Leon by Kit de Waal, The Power by Naomi Alderman, Our Glorious Heresies, The Underground Railroad, The Essex Serpent,
  • One Short Story anthology/collection (Can be ARC)
  • One Poetry Book (can be ARC)

I think that this guideline will make me feel like I’m on top of new things but keeping up with building my library and knowledge base, as well as being connected to the canon.

If you have had a similar experience and have advice or think I should incorporate something else in the list all recommendations are welcome!

Gork, the Teenage Dragon | Book Review

“For inside my scale green chest, there beats a grotesquely large and sensitive heart.”

32766443I hope this book gets turned into a children’s cartoon series because I would watch it with a lot of passion. Gork: the Teenage Dragon, is Gabe Hudson’s debut middle-grade fantasy novel. The narrative follows a dragon named Gork who, you guessed it, is a teenager. What’s particularly charming about this novel is its snappy humour. Gork narrates his story and in the first chapter he establishes himself as:

“My first name is Gork, my middle name is The, and my last name is Terrible, and like I said, I’m a dragon, plus I’m a poet”

But not before criticizing Beowulf and Tolkien to no end for their bad portrayal of dragons. He says:

“Mr. Tolkien was a real low-hearted sonuvabitch.”

Gork is in high school at WarWings Military Academy where he is a little different than the other dragons. He is afraid of heights, and really does have a large heart. His nickname is: Weak Sauce. His main purpose in this novel is to find himself a queen, for if he fails to do so he will become a slave forever.

Maybe I read Spinster, and All the Single Ladies too closely together this year and only in the last month, but this ‘despair’ that young Gork has throughout this novel really resembled for me the pressures society put on women in the past. You must find a husband or be ridiculed as a ‘spinster’ or enslaved in various other forms. I hope I’m not reading incorrectly into this children’s book, but this is the first time I’ve read a book where the male character is forced, nay, obliged and in ardent despair to find himself a partner. While other books have shown this dynamic from a male perspective, never with such urgency, and I’ve personally never encountered it in children’s literature. Well done Gabe Hudson!

Politics aside, I must return to the humour. This book is so funny. I found it funny as an adult who is quite in love with dragons and I wonder how the children would take this same humour. There’s something in his voice that echoes Lemony Snicket for me, though his publishers insist that it’s ‘Harry Potter meets Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.’ Either way, I suggest we, the readers, allow Hudson to have his own voice through Gork. I also enjoyed the ways he doesn’t shy away from swearing a little bit (never vulgar though). Highly recommend! I would also suggest that parents read this book aloud to their children, or librarians to their students at circle reading time. It’s a great bonding book! I look forward to Hudson’s future novels.

This book is scheduled for publication on July 11, from Knopf Publishing Group.

Attributed to the Harrow Painter | Poetry Review

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Red-figure Hydria is attributed to the Harrow Painter

The Harrow Painter was an ancient Greek painter of archaic red-figure pottery. Approximately 39 vases have been attributed to him and he got named ‘The Harrow Painter’ by J.D. Beazley in a 1916 article titled “Two Vases in Harrow.”

In the conclusion to this collection Twemlow writes about the Harrow Painter:

“though he has been justly called ‘more than ordinarily competent,’ the Harrow Painter was indeed a minor talent, notwithstanding the undeniable charm of some of his works. If, however, one looks beyond the quality of his line and his relatively low standing in the artistic pantheon, one discovers in him many elements of interest and more than a few delightful pictures.”

35010723The collection of poems Attributed to the Harrow Painter by Nick Twemlow depicts the highly personal bond between father and son (respectively his son Sasha who is named in the poem and dedication) almost like he is talking directly to his little boy as he grows. Both father and son have an eye for art: sculptors like Brancusi, Hellenist sculptures and frescoes, natural landmarks like Burnett’s Mound, etc. There are many classical references throughout the collection of poems, mixed in with Polonius-like advice for his son:

“& don’t worry so much / About whether they think / You’re a boy or a girl. / You have much / To look forward to / In the matrix / Of gods & trends.”

Reading this collection felt like I was watching a father raise his son, teaching him about art, sculptures, and the classical period, and simultaneously getting glimpses into the reflections the father has on his son growing up:

“armed with your vicious / Youth / Your tabula rasa affect / Your deep understanding of nothing.”

Overall the effect achieved by catching a glimpse into one particular father-son bond over art is one of intrusion. Unlike poets who discuss more general “applicable to all” kind of poems, Twemlow’s collection feels like it was written specifically for his son and no one else, and we, the readers, are mere observers.

Strangely enough I feel like this poetry collection belongs more with art majors than poetry majors. I would recommend this work to people who have an eye for reading into classical art, who enjoy sculptures, and who want to catch a glimpse into one particular father-son bond.

This book is scheduled for publication in November from University of Iowa Press.

May Wrap-Up | 2017

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Books I read for Reviews (with links)

  • Drinks with Dead Poets by Glyn Maxwell. A poet/professor wakes in a town where he must teach a syllabus on dead poets, and the dead poets come to life (To be published in August of 2017)
  • Matter & Desire by Andreas Weber. Academic text exploring the relationship between our existence and nature through erotic experience (To be published August 3, 2017)
  • The Man Who Loved Libraries by Andrew Larsen. This is a very short children’s book about Andrew Carnegie (to be published August 15)
  • Thin Places by Lesley Choyce. Free verse poem telling the story of Declan Lynch who can hear voices and follows them. (To be published July 29, 2017)
  • The Excursionist by J.D. Sumner. This is a travel satire with a very grumpy main character (published May 17)
  • The New Voices of Fantasy edited by Peter S. Beagle. A collection of new fantasy short stories (to be published August 18, 2017)
  • Scion of the Fox by S.M Beiko. Young adult book with magic, battles, family traditions and history, and is very much entwined with the natural realm (out for publication October 17, 2017)
  • Ewan Pendle and the White Wraith by Shaun Hume. Pleasant children’s adventure about Ewan Pendle who receives a special education. (published)
  • How to Read Nature by Tristan Gooley – book on navigating through nature and reviving the connection between ourselves and the natural realm (out for publication August 22, 2017)
  • Of Men and Women by Pearl S. Buck – short essays comparing the American household to that of China, published/written in 1941, currently being republished in a newer, updated eBook edition (out for publication June 27, 2017)
  • Ex Libris – Anthology of Sci-fi and Fantasy short stories with Librarians, Libraries, and Lore (out for publication July 11, 2017)
  • The Cloud Versus Grand Unification Theory by Chris Banks – poetry collection (out for publication Sept 5, 2017)
  • Hunger by Roxane Gay – a memoir; a history of Roxane Gay’s body and experience with weight gain (out for publication June 13, 2017)
  • Up Against Beyond by Jason Holt –Poetry collection (out for publication July 20, 2017)
  • Iain M. Banks by Paul Kincaid –academic book, short biography, close analysis/reading of Iain M. Banks and his works published both as ‘Iain M. Banks’ and ‘Iain Banks’ (out for publication May 30, 2017)

Books I read for Myself

I had a great reading month mostly because I had all the time in the world: no work, no school, no exams.

According to my Audible App I also spent about 8 Hours listening. The listening included a variety of dramatizations of classics, or some audiobooks for the things listed below where I would follow along in the text while listening to an audiobook.

I read two short stories:

“The Machine Stops” – by E.M. Forster which already made it onto my ‘favourites’ list. The story is written in 1909 but it’s highly prophetic and describes a time where people are glued to conversation machines and lose touch with the organic. It’s like a “pre-WALLE” critique of our attachment to screens.

“The Pit and the Pendulum” by Edgar Allan Poe. This story took me a while to get into, mainly because I wasn’t sure what was happening for the first few pages. A man wakes up tied, in a pit, where a pendulum swings above him (one of those with a blade) and he doesn’t know why. He spends the story figuring it out. It didn’t really strike me in any way and it’s not as memorable as “The Black Cat.”

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte

9200000000656014I then read my monthly classic. This month I chose The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. Again, this didn’t sit with me quite as well as Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights. What I’m saying is: I can see why it’s important, I can engage in conversation about many aspects of it BUT reading it wasn’t a very exciting experience. Anne looked at domestic abuse and the ways women would put up physical barriers like Wildfell Hall itself. I liked the many perspectives in this work but I had one major issue with this novel and that was the characterization of Gilbert Markham, the first narrator. Gilbert as a first narrator to me was so feminine that I had a hard time imagining this man as a (straight) man. Everything he said was something I could never picturing a man caring about like the way a woman’s eyebrows look like, or the fabric of their clothing. It sucks that in my head I kept comparing Markham to manly Rochester and Heathcliff but one cannot help but lump the Brontes together. I would have no problems with bending gender norms and stereotypes but I think in this case Anne Bronte just didn’t know how to capture a masculine voice. I did enjoy that Helen was a painter and the descriptions of her paintings got to me in a very heartwarming way. Helen’s character is very interesting.

Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel

sleepinggiantsI am not sure how to describe the synopsis without spoilers. I’m going to briefly borrow parts from the synopsis at the back. Rose Franklin falls through the earth when she is a child and ends up in the palm of a giant metal hand. She spends her life studying physics and gets involved with a military/science team in search for other remaining parts of these giant metal giants which are scattered worldwide. The book is written in interview format. Interviews are conducted with Rose connecting her personal experience to the expeditions, with Kara Resnik (a military leader on this mission), and with other members involved in this investigation. I sort of imagined it as someone from the Pentagon interviewing all the people involved or around anything relating to these robot parts showing up all over. There are romances hidden, mysterious components to the robots or “giants” and it’s definitely not boring. I read this book with the text in hand and with the audiobook. It is an experience I recommend mainly because audible has different voices for the different characters and you really experience their presence. Lastly, I couldn’t help but be reminded of A Monster Calls, The Iron Giant, and most of all the giant guardians that are dormant in Disney’s Atlantis: The Lost Empire. I don’t know if anyone remembers those but as a kid I watched Atlantis so many times and the moment when the giants pop out from the ground to protect the city is a scene forever ingrained in my memory. I don’t know if I’m alone in making this association.

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River of Teeth by Sarah Gailey

river-of-teethThis is a small novella that just got published by Tor.com. In the early 20th century America had a plan to import hippos to supplement the meat shortage. The plan was scrapped but Sarah Gailey re-imagines an alternate 1890s where hippos are present in the U.S. It’s a weird hybrid of fantasy and a westerner. This is the story of Winslow Houndstooth who rides his hippo. Every rider in this book has a hippo. Tor.com published an article introducing every hippo by name here. The novella is only 170 pages and a very easy read. The cover art is done by Richard Anderson and designed by Christine Foltzer. I’ll put together a better review for this on Goodreads later tonight.

Concluding Thoughts and Announcement

My favourite reads this month were Drinks with Dead Poets by Glyn Maxwell and Ex Libris: Libraries, Librarians, and Lore. I’ve also been reading Age of Myth by Michael J. Sullivan which I have not yet finished so it will be featured in next month’s wrap-up.

announcement-clipart-cliparti1_announcement-clipart_09BIG ANNOUNCEMENT! Along with Ennet House I will be reading Infinite Jest from June 1 to September 18 (along other books of course). If you would like to participate there is still time to get the book and join our community. More details on this HERE. Everyone is welcome!