Lists

Nonfiction November

In the bookish community online, November is known as “Nonfiction Month.” Or, at least the month in which readers attempt to read at least ONE Nonfiction text. In order for you to participate you just have to read one nonfiction work. I think that’s doable!

Olive set the ‘challenges’ for this year’s NonFic November. Here’s a link to her channel.

The challenges are as follows (and left open ended for everyone’s interpretation): Home, Substance, Love, and Scholarship

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These are my choices:

  1. Home: I will be reading House of Fiction: From Pemberley to Brideshead, Great British Houses in Literature and Life by Phyllis Richardson. I interpreted this in the literal sense as in: about houses. Others have interpreted this as a book about a small home (family), or a home for seniors, or children. Others read books with the setting in the country where they come from, or the city they were raised in…their personal memories of ‘home.’ It’s up to you.
  2. Substance: for this I will be reading the history of my favourite substance. I’ve always wanted to know more about the history of coffee. So I will be reading Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and How it Transformed the World by Mark Pendergrast
  3. Love: as you can guess some people read the story of a romance in history or a topic that they specifically love. I love the latter because it opens the topic widely. I love animals, and I found this book called Being a Beast by Charles Foster by accident. I read that the author explores the behaviours of animals by pretending to be them for a while. I love this topic and this method.
  4. Scholarship: this is my favourite topic! For this I’ve selected the book I look forward to most: The Vampyre Family: The Curse of Byron by Andrew McConnell Stott. This book explores the biographies and relationships (as well as writing) of Lord Byron, Mary Shelley, and Percy Shelley.

Victober Announcement and TBR

October is less than two weeks away and in the bookish community “Victober” planning is upon us. Victober is hosted this year by Kate Howe, Katie from Books and Things, Ange from Beyond the Pages, and Lucy the Reader. Each one of their links will lead you to their video introductions for Victober. In short, Victober is a series of challenges or guidelines to follow as we read Victorian literature for the month of October.

General Guidelines

  • Victorian literature as a label is generally attached to any book published from 1837-1901 in Great Britain under the reign of Queen Victoria. Some choose to be slightly looser with the term. For instance Frankenstein by Mary Shelley was published in 1818 and wouldn’t technically fit under the ‘Victorian’ label but some people still choose it for Victober, and that’s fine. Depends on how specific you want to get with this challenge.
  • There are a total of five ‘challenges,’ however you can mix and match challenges if one book fits in more categories, so long as you read at least 3.

2017 Challenges

  1. Read a book that was recommended to you
  2. Read a book by a Scottish, Welsh, or Irish author
  3. Read a book containing supernatural elements
  4. Read a lesser known Victorian book with less than 2000 Goodreads reviews
  5. Read a book written by a Victorian woman author

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My TBR for Victober

  1. Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy – book recommended to me by a close friend who took a Victorian Lit course and enjoyed the book immensely.
  2. Dr.Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson—Scottish writer
  3. The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins contains supernatural elements. There is a group on Goodreads moderated by Kate Howe, who kindly invited me to the group after finding out I am also reading it for Victober. If you want to choose this book for your selection you are welcome to join the group. Link to it HERE. (you can count it as my recommendation to you if you want to count it for #1 instead of #3)

I combined challenges 4 and 5 into:

  1. Bronte: Poems (the Everyman’s Library Pocket Poets) edition. Most of the poems are written by Emily Bronte (a woman writer—challenge 5) and the collection has only 169 Reviews on Goodreads which is way below the 2000 limit.

 

So if you are interested in participating, please do! Perhaps you want to try Victorian Lit for the fist time, or return to some books you read in the past. Either way, it’s a great little community of book lovers, and this activity is a lot of fun. You have some time to plan your reading list, and well…happy reading!

 

 

Arthur C. Clarke Winners | Reading List

ACCA

Seeing as there are not that many books which have won the Arthur C. Clarke Award I would like to take on this project and try to read all the winners. I created a Downloadable PDF as well with this entire list below in case you want to print it and complete the challenge in the near future. The “check” option can be used for taking them out of the library, buying them, or reading them (it’s up to you). I linked every novel to the Goodreads option if you would like to read more into each individual book or add it to your reading lists.

The Arthur C. Clarke Award is the most prestigious award in Britain for Science Fiction. According to their website: “The annual award is given for the best science fiction novel first published in the United Kingdom during the previous year.” This is my little mini-project but all are welcome to do it! I just created the resource pdf to make it a bit easier. There are people WAY more skilled than me at discussing this award. I strongly recommend (my personal favourite booktuber) Kalanadi. <–  there’s no way I could keep up with her, and her reviews are phenomenal.

Check Year Novel Author
2017 The Underground Railroad  Colson Whitehead
X 2016 Children of Time Adrian Tchaikovsky
X 2015 Station Eleven Emily St. John Mandel
X 2014 Ancillary Justice Ann Leckie
2013 Dark Eden Chris Beckett
2012 The Testament of Jessie Lamb Jane Rogers
2011 Zoo City Lauren Beukes
2010 The City & The City China Miéville
2009 Song of Time Ian R. MacLeod
2008 Black Man Richard Morgan
2007 Nova Swing M. John Harrison
2006 Air Geoff Ryman
2005 Iron Council China Miéville
2004 Quicksilver Neal Stephenson
2003 The Separation Christopher Priest
2002 Bold As Love Gwyneth Jones
2001 Perdido Street Station China Miéville
2000 Distraction Bruce Sterling
1999 Dreaming in Smoke Tricia Sullivan
1998 The Sparrow Mary Doria Russell
1997 The Calcutta Chromosome Amitav Ghosh
1996 Fairyland Paul J. McAuley
1995 Fools Pat Cadigan
1994 Vurt Jeff Noon
1993 Body of Glass Marge Piercy
1992 Synners Pat Cadigan
1991 Take Back Plenty Colin Greenland
1990 The Child Garden Geoff Ryman
1989 Unquenchable Fire Rachel Pollack
1988 The Sea and Summer George Turner
1987 The Handmaid’s Tale Margaret Atwood

 

Wanderlust Reading List

Wonderlust

Summer is here! Not only is the weather just right for traveling and having adventures of your own, but it’s also a great time to read books that inspire wanderlust. The list contains several books I read and thoroughly enjoyed along with some that fellow librarians, family, and friends have recommended. Hopefully there will be at least one title in the list that is right for you.

For full list downloadable and printable PDF click HERE <–

For other recommendations based on reader preferences check out this Goodreads LIST

I also highly recommend Tristan Gooley’s books The Lost Art of Reading Nature’s Signs, and How to Read Nature as a tool when taking nature walks or longer nature trips. His works are very helpful.

The titles below are clickable and it will link you to Amazon if you would like to purchase a copy. The public library should also have at least one copy of each one of these books.  You can also access the Online eBook for free using your library card using OverDrive.

2No Baggage by Clara Bensen  1

A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson

In a Sunburn Country by Bill Bryson

The Good Girl’s Guide to Getting Lost by Rachel Friedman

A Walk Across America by Peter Jenkins

On the Road by Jack Kerouac

The Dharma Bums by Jack Kerouac

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer

Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer

The Longest Way Home by Andrew McCarthy

Vagabonding by Rolf Potts

Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston

Walking the Amazon by Ed Stafford

Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck

Wild by Cheryl Strayed

Honeymoon with My Brother by Franz Wisner

 

 

 

I would also like to share with you another great resource if you like adventure and that is “World Travelers United” blog. You can also find them on Facebook and Instagram. Just looking at the photos inspires wanderlust! Hope you enjoy the reading list and if you would like to recommend others please comment below!