elderly

Plank’s Law | Book Review

imagesLast month I reviewed a poetry collection Thin Places by Leslie Choyce which will be released July 29. I received Plank’s Law from LibraryThing Early Reviewers and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

This story follows a teenage boy named Trevor who has lived a sheltered life and now has only one year left to live. He has been diagnosed with Huntington’s disease when he was 10 years old and it has recently aggravated. In a moment of reflection he finds himself on the side of a cliff imagining that he would just jump when an elderly man named ‘Plank’ stops him and starts talking to him. Trevor is having a Hamletesque experience, he says:

 “I think about doing things, but that’s about it.”

Plank tells Trevor that there are two parts to ‘Plank’s Law’ or his own way of living. The first is: “just live” and the second: “Brains don’t count. Imagination is what counts.” Trevor thinks about what Plank has said, and creates a list of all the things he wants to do. As an adult I had to take a step back and understand his choices as a young teenage boy because I don’t think “to drive a Lamborghini” and “get arrested” would be on my bucket list.

Trevor has many moments of reflection where he narrates about his family, and makes various lists like: the primary bucket list, secondary smaller goals, the many factors that shaped his life, and lists about people he meets. As a character his is a little different. He broods a bit more than he does activity, refuses to take too many chances, is intrigued by religion and thinks of himself as a Buddhist and Christian, and loves to watch Sci-Fi films. Trevor’s life changes even more-so when he meets a girl named Sara. Every time he feels lost he revisits the elderly man Plank and is set straight by Plank’s matter-of-fact attitude about life.

The book has a good message and a good premise but I found the vocabulary to be a bit simplistic, especially for its intended audience. There’s also a lot of telling and not enough showing. The first 50 pages are filled with “but before I move on let me tell you about my mom…my dad…my grandpop.” This is a bit too much because no one does this even in real life, you find things out as you go along. This book also contains a lot of profane language especially when Plank needs to come across as a ‘cranky old man’: a lot of “bullshit” and “fuck offs.” Those components irked me a little as a reader.

What I did enjoy was the premise. It’s a good message to stop overthinking, to prioritize imagination, to just live, and take each moment in your stride. There are some great lines scattered through the book from time to time like: “the best parts of your life are the ones you share with someone else.” I also enjoyed the ending in that it wasn’t a cartoon ending, nor was it world-shattering. It was just right and realistic. I prefer realistic endings so hats off in that respect. I also appreciated that Choyce decided to shed some light on Huntington’s disease because I’ve rarely encountered it in young adult fiction. If I were to recommend this book, I would hand it to people who are having a bit of a crisis and need some perspective (teens and adults alike).

The book will be published in September by Orca Book publishers.