listening

Welcome to Night Vale | Review

23129410This book has been an experience for me in the last week: I read the text while listening to the audiobook, and listened to the Podcast when colouring, walking, or doing other activities.

The book is written by Joseph Fink and Jeffrey Cranor and is published by Harper Perennial.

Night Vale is a town in the middle of the ‘American’ desert that is overall peculiar. All its inhabitants are very strange. The main story follows a single mom (of a shape-shifting boy) Diane, and a pawnshop owner named Jackie. A mysterious man in a tan jacket arrives leaving behind a note with only two words on it “King City.” The memories of this man fade and all Jackie is left with is “King City.” It’s a mystery/thriller that feels very much like Twin Peaks, but with the storytelling style of The Twilight Zone. The strangeness of each character is fantastical similar to Stranger Things where it’s sci-fi but told in a realistic way, highlighting human mundane problems using the supernatural. Between the narratives there are passages that look like transcripts from the town radio show. The radio passages unite the narratives because the news applies to all citizens of Night Vale and as a reader one can get a better sense of what goes on in town and what all the characters talk about communally.

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Podcast Cover

I understand that the Podcast is wildly popular and has achieved great success between 2015 and 2016. I did not get a chance to finish the Podcast so I will write my impressions of the book/audiobook.

First: if you can get the audiobook I recommend it strongly. In fact, if you must choose between the printed text and the audio, choose the audio. There are several reasons why it works better in audio format. The first reason is that in Night Vale there is a radio broadcast and the narrator who reads the radio host voice Cecil is also the one who does it in the podcast. The second reason is that this is not a ‘literary’ book, but a highly atmospheric one. The musical accompaniment and sound effects from the audiobook help enhance the setting and atmosphere. It reminded me of so many things (like the shows mentioned above) and reading it I just got an overall feeling of eeriness and mystery. The plot itself is not that exciting and the characters are not that deep, but somehow it works and it works well.

If I had to choose between its three existing formats as a narrative I would say the Podcast is the best. Although I haven’t heard it through to the end, I can tell from the few episodes that it is this narrative’s best format. The novelization incorporates some characters from the Podcast but not necessarily the best ones. There are several parts with lulls where the novel lost my interest but it does pick up again.

That said, overall I loved this book and the experience of it. I look forward to finishing all the Podcast episodes.

The book is filled with lines that left me in awe and some that just made me laugh out loud. Here are some examples of lines I found funny and some I found beautiful.

Humour extracted from Cecil’s Broadcast:

“coming up after this break, some exclusive clips from my recent three-hour interview with myself, in which I interrogated myself on my motivations, where I am in life, why I’m not in a different place in life, whose fault that is, and why I said that one embarrassing thing once.”

“If you see one of these False Police, act right away by shrugging and thinking What am I gonna do? And then seeing if anything funny is on Twitter”

“if the School Board could not promise to prevent children from learning about dangerous activities like drug use and library science at recess…”

“if you see hooded figures in the Dog Park, no you didn’t.”

Beautiful Lines

“Later she understood databases, having become the person she’d lied about being…”

“How does a person discover whether they are shy if they never have the time to meet new people?”

“There is nothing more lonely than an action taken quietly on your own, and nothing more comforting than doing that same quiet action in parallel with fellow humans doing the same action, everyone alone next to each other.”

“She left the shower as most people leave showers, clean and a little lonely”

“A person’s life is only what they do.”

Hopefully I captured some of Night Vale’s charm. I definitely recommend the Podcast, and the book/audiobook. This work will have a sequel coming out on October 17 this year with the title: It Devours! from the same authors.

The Audiobook is available through the public library with Overdrive. The ebook is also on Overdrive, and  the public library should have the printed copy in its system.

There are also two volumes of the Welcome to Night Vale podcast SCRIPTS:

  1. Mostly Void, Partially Stars
  2. The Great Glowing Coils of the Universe

 

 

Audiobook Resources

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  1. librivoxLibrivox.org: This was my introduction to the audiobook world back in high school. This organization runs on volunteers from all over the world reading and recording books on demand. Because it’s free and volunteer-run, it can only cover books that are in the public domain (not under copyright). It’s basically the ‘project Gutenberg’ of audiobooks. The pros are: free audiobooks. However, the cons are: most books won’t include new releases or even relatively new ones (like 10-20 years old), and because it’s a volunteer-run audiobook program, sometimes you will get haptics, coughing, different volumes of recording, static, etc. For instance, some books that are longer like Ulysses will get various volunteers from all over the world and one chapter will sound awful, one will sound great, one will have a lot of background noise, some accents won’t be understandable, etc. I personally liked this ‘con’ because it felt like I was being read to by a friend and I enjoyed those human errors. However, sometimes it’s a bit frustrating like when reading a play because every character is played by a person who is not in the same room and every line is very choppy and has a delay.
  1. audibleAudible I am a devout audible member because I enjoy listening to newer audiobooks. The only ‘con’ to audible is that you have to pay for the books and the subscription. As an avid audiobook listener I found this membership price to be worth it. You get access to podcasts on almost every topic under the sun including TED talks, and my personal favourite: Orson Welles broadcasts. The variety of lifestyle, literature, science, as well as vintage podcasts given free entry is worth every penny. There are also dramatizations of classics like Jane Eyre. The podcasts here are called Channels and you can tap into almost every topic. There’s one on dialogues between MacArthur Genius Grant winners, or stand up comedians…and everything in between. The audiobooks themselves are of new books and old/classics. Sometimes a famous actor will read an audiobook which is always nice to hear. My personal favourites are Nick Offerman and Richard Armitage. I am an audible believer so I would strongly recommend a membership, but again, it’s only worth it if you do use it. According to my stats I listen to about 15 hours per month. This is a sum of me listening while shelving books, while painting, while commuting etc.
  1. one clickOneClickDigital: This audiobook program is a hybrid of the two above. It is a system connected to the public library. You can download the app on your phone or tablet, or get an online account and connect to it using your library card. It has books that are a mix of new and old but it won’t have brand new releases right away in form of audio. OneClickDigital also has eBooks in addition to eAudiobooks. Because it works through the library system you must “check out” an audiobook meaning, once downloaded, it will remain on your phone for a limited amount of time, as if it was a library book. Nothing stops you from checking it out again. It’s a good balance of book selections and it’s free, so long as you have a library card.od-touch-icon
  1. OverDrive: OverDrive works like OneClickDigital through the public library. I found that OverDrive is connected to more public libraries than OneClickDigital and has wider selections.
  1. GraphicAudio: The quality of the audiobooks on this is top notch. Their tagline is “a movie inLbvJ3SJ- your mind” which is quite possibly the best descriptor for how their audiobooks are produced. GraphicAudio includes a few free short stories, and has discount codes for sets, or other deals from time to time. The content is by far the most different from all the rest. They have obscure comic books, graphic novels, fantasy series. It’s like entering an entirely different new world. It is a bit pricey and sometimes one can find discounts as I mentioned, but if this is your niche, it’s worth it.

Other Resources for Audiobooks:

Pay/Digital:

Pay/Physical

  • Bookstores like: Chapters/Indigo (Canada), Barnes and Noble (US), Blackwells (UK) have physical CDs.
  • Used bookstores like BMV often have discounted prices for the same CDs only they are of older books.

Free Digital:

  • Typing “audiobook” on YouTube often leads to free chapters
  • Tor.com often has free audiobooks for individual short stories featured on their website. These are most likely to be Science Fiction and Fantasy.
  • OpenCulture has over 900 free audiobooks in various formats, but like librivox they are in the public domain and can only have books out of copyright
  • Escape Pod – Science Fiction podcast with frequent readings